Sheave Tower

Today another adventure with Nigel was scheduled. First stop was not originally planned but then I remembered that Sheave tower was pretty close to where we were heading so we made an unplanned stop before continuing on.

Sheave Tower

Sheave Tower

Sheave tower is considered one of the oldest hyrdo generating plants in Ontario. Restored in 1999 to its original colour it no longer has any working parts but stands tall in its forested surroundings begging passerbys, who catch a glance of the oxblood red colour, to stop and stay awhile. Across the road sits the Blair Mill which Sheave helped supply extra power to in its hay day.

Nigel and I continued on from here to our original destination – a marsh located off a road I can’t even remember the name of. Sandhill cranes could be seen in the distance but unfortunately even my long lens could not get a worthwhile shot. With Canada Geese and Red-winged Blackbirds in abundance they all seemed to be out of the reach of my lens.

Female Red-winged Blackbird

Female Red-winged Blackbird

I did get a shot of a female Red-winged Blackbird but I’m feeling that I need to revisit this spot again in the future. Of course, I’ll have to ask Nigel where the heck we were before that happens.

Our final spot for the day was Luther Marsh.

Reflections

Reflections

Ice is still on the lakes and ponds here and the reflections in some of the open areas caught my attention.

Just outside the park the melting snow has left behind puddles creating a shallow marsh area where many birds seem to like hanging out. Two pairs of sandhill cranes wander this area. I’ve decided that if I continue pursuing these birds I need a much longer lens. Until that day they will live in my photographs as small brown birds in a see of brown grass. Luckily more days and chances await in the future.

This entry was posted in Bird Photography, HDR Photography, Local Photography, Parks.

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