Pink and Red

I’ve brought my 105mm lens on my walk today to reshoot the leaf from yesterday. The reason for switching to the 105mm was to see if I could get more of the leaf in focus. 

Pink Leaf Take Two

I think it did a much better job than the 55mm lens. You can see more of the veining in the leaf than with the 55mm lens. I’m much happier with this photo.

Japanese Spindle Tree Berry

On the opposite side of the creek, I found these pink berries. I only see them in late fall, and this year I’ve finally identified what this plant is – the Japanese Spindle. It’s native to China, Korea, and Japan so obviously someone planted this in their backyard where it’s made its way into the creek area.

Rosehip

I walked by the area where there were so many dogwood roses in summer. The roses are now gone, but a few rosehips have been left behind on the bare branches.

I spotted a lot of pink and red today on my walk. It looks like late fall isn’t so brown after all.

The Old Apple Tree

Just another day in the neighbourhood, walking around, taking some photos. But before I get to that, I did get out for a walk in Claireville with my friend Nigel. And I only have one photo to show for it.

Under the Old Tree

Under the Old Tree

Yup, this is it. No other photo I took here looked good to me. I heavily edited this one – added a new sky (the old one was so blah) and I gave it a nice autumn glow. 

Because I was so underwhelmed by the Claireville photos, I went for that neighbourhood walk I mentioned. I was much more successful on this walk.

Pink Leaf

Pink Leaf

I mean, come on, look at this pretty pink leaf. I have no idea what kind of plant it is, but I can tell you it was low to the ground and the nearby tree didn’t have the same leaves. Another one to add to the books to figure out. Oh, and you’ll notice the focus is not sharp on the entire leaf. That’s because I was using my old manual 55mm lens. It has a very small area of focus. It frustrates me a lot. Now and again I still try to use it. One day I will conquer it. I may have to come back again and shoot it with my 105mm lens to compare the difference.

Apples

Further down the path, I found an apple tree with its yellow fruit just hanging around. These particular apples caught my attention because of how the light was shining on them. I was much happier with the photos from my neighbourhood walk today. Sometimes you just need a change of scenery. And surprisingly for me, that was going back to my neighbourhood walk.

Hiking in Drynan Forest

Nigel and I found a new favourite hike, and it’s in Wellington County. The Drynan Forest trail is located on the west side of Cambridge. This 5-kilometre trail is a loop trail that passes some small lakes with some spectacular views.

Lake in Drynan Forest

Lake in Drynan Forest

The first lake we came across had a couple of lookouts, where we were able to get some shots of the autumn colours. With the stormy-looking clouds, we had some great reflections and soft light. 

Orange Jelly Spot

Orange Jelly Mushroom

Of course, I can’t forget about the little things. This Orange Jelly mushroom also called Witches Butter, can be found year-round, even in very cold temperatures. Apparently, it is edible and also has some medicinal properties. I can’t say I would rush out to try it, but maybe one day, If an experienced forager told me it wouldn’t poison me, I might taste it.

Drynan Trail

The great thing about the Drynan trail is it’s varied. You definitely don’t get bored on this walk, there is always something to see even when there are only trees around you. This particular tree in the distance stood out among its neighbours. I wanted to highlight it when I processed my image, so I darkened the edges and brightened up the tree. 

Coloured Reflections

Coloured Reflections

The final lake we passed at the end of the trail caught my eye. There were lots of colours here, and although the water wasn’t absolutely still, I liked how the reflections blurred slightly.

I was a little sad when the trail brought us back to the car. We will definitely be coming back to hike this one again.

Deep in the Forest

I’m back in Claireville today with my friend NIgel. We met at the east entrance and decided to take a different path. We hoped to find some interesting things to photograph on this unused trail.

Deep in the Forest

Deep in the Forest

The trail is overgrown and I’m not sure if that’s because the main path is much easier to walk or if its because they have taken this trail off the map. It wan’t one that was well travelled in the past and with COVID and the parking lot shut down for a few months things that may have been the cause of this trail’s state.

New England Aster

New England Aster

When I first shot this photograph of the New England aster I thought it was a new flower that I haven’t come across before. I didn’t realize that this is how the aster grows. It’s prettier all curled up then when its open. LOL

Small Milkweed Bug

Small Milkweed Bug

Wandering into a large meadow in a small valley I decided to shoot a specific milkweed pod that came to my attention. It wasn’t until I was photographing it that I realized that there was this small milkweed bug making its rounds on it. It was a stroke of luck to catch this guy on this particular plant and we took full advantage of the situation. This was my favourite shot from our hike today.

The Black and White Neighbourhood

Today on my neighbourhood walk, I decided to focus on photographing subjects that would look good in black and white. It had rained earlier today so things were wet and droplets were in abundance. Droplets on leaves always look fantastic in black and white, in my opinion.

Wet Leaves

Wet Leaves

On the sidewalk, I came across this leaf that was infested with eggs, or at least, I think they’re eggs. Regardless, it looked neat and it caught my attention and so the photo was taken.

Eggs on Leaf

Eggs on Leaf

Close to the end of my walk, I found this white-lipped snail having a munch on a dried leaf. 

White-lipped snail

White-lipped snail

Usually I just see these little guys hanging out on stems – either snoozing or slowing making their way somewhere. This one, however, I could actually see eating, If you look hard at the photo can you “see” him eating?

Some Macro Photography in Claireville

I was in Claireville today with my friend Nigel shooting some macro photography. Mostly it was a hike where we took a few photos and chatted. It’s harder to get inspired once autumn begins to fade. It hasn’t gone yet but here in Claireville, autumn has mostly moved on.

Elfdock

Elfdock

But sometimes you find something interesting to photograph, if you look hard enough. These Elfdock were dried up and standing tall in open fields. Using a shallow depth of field, I was able to focus on just the one grouping and blur out the rest in the background.

Milkweed

Milkweed

It had rained a little this afternoon so this Milkweed still had some raindrops on it. This gave it a little more interest. I used the same technique as I did in the first photo to blur out the background, keeping the focus on the one plant. That’s the benefit to using a macro lens. When getting up close and personal with a small object the background becomes much softer allowing the focus to be on a specific part of what you’re photographing,

Common Blue Wood Aster

Common Blue Wood Aster

Deep on the forest trail we found these small blooms. Up until now I’ve predominantly seen the purple aster but this is the Common Blue Wood Aster. It seems that asters really like the fall weather. In my research, I found out that these small flowers are important food sources for butterflies, bees and other insects in the fall months. Once these flowers go to seed the birds will also be able to benefit in fall and into the winter months. Nifty little plants and another nice walk around the park.